Constantine Theodosiou

Constantine E. Theodosiou, Ph.D., joined Manhattan College in July 2011. He most recently served as vice provost for research, dean of the graduate school and professor of physics at Montclair State University, where he supervised all aspects of graduate education and the grant proposal process for research projects. Dean Theodosiou helped the graduate school implement an electronic graduate admission application process, and also integrated an electronic grant proposal submission system in the office of research.

Before Montclair State University, Dean Theodosiou spent 28 years working for the University of Toledo, most recently as interim dean of the college of graduate studies in 2007–08. He also served as the associate dean for the natural sciences and mathematics in the college of arts and sciences, interim director of the Plant Science Research Center, interim director of the Lake Erie Research Center, acting chair and associate chair of physics and astronomy, director of graduate studies, and professor of physics. He also worked at Drexel University and the National Hellenic Research Foundation in Greece.

Dean Theodosiou is also a teacher and a scholar: he has prepared and taught 36 different courses and has conducted scientific research on a broad range of topics, including atomic structure and spectroscopy, electronic and atomic collisions, quantum optics and multi-photon processes, and low-temperature plasma processes. His research has been published in more than 70 journal and book articles. Other academic distinctions include: Fulbright Research Scholar at the National Hellenic Research Foundation, Visiting Fellow for the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics at the University of Colorado, Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the University of Freiburg in Germany, research associate at Johns Hopkins University, research assistant at the University of Chicago, and research fellow at the Nuclear Research Center Democritos in Greece.

Dean Theodosiou graduated from the University of Chicago with a doctorate in atomic physics in 1977 and a master’s degree in physics in 1973. He holds a physics and mathematics diploma from the National University of Greece.