Manhattan College Presents Holocaust Painting Exhibition

A selection of paintings by the artist Marilyn Honigman will go on display on Monday, Nov. 16 in the Alumni Room of Manhattan College’s O’Malley Library.

A selection of paintings by the artist Marilyn Honigman will go on display on Monday, Nov. 16 in the Alumni Room of Manhattan College’s O’Malley Library. Remembrance: A Daughter’s Reflections, co-sponsored by the Manhattan College archives and the Holocaust Resource Center, will run until Dec. 18.

The exhibit’s opening coincides with the second annual Frederick M. Schweitzer Lecture on the Holocaust, to be held on Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. in Smith Auditorium. Dr. Samuel Kassow, the Charles Northam Professor at Trinity College, will deliver the lecture Between History and Catastrophe: Emanuel Ringelblum in the Warsaw Ghetto.
 
Inspired by photos that an American solider gave to her father after he was liberated from Dachau, the paintings are a visual representation of the Holocaust that has evolved slowly. There are no accusations or condemnation, just contemplation of the psychological space in which we find ourselves.
 
“My personal experiences and family history have drawn me to the Holocaust as a subject for my work,” says Honigman. “What I hope to accomplish as an artist is to form my subject into an expressive image that touches the viewer directly, invoking both personal and universal emotions.”
 
Honigman’s art seeks to engage the viewer emotionally and personally. She takes on the daunting task of representing the horrors of war, using forms and colors that are consistent with the subject matter. Her landscapes are a series of reflections on humanity viewed through the lens of nature: they evoke mystery and suspense through atmospheric paintings of skies, clouds and gathering storms.
 
“The goal I face as an artist confronting the ravages of war that continue to frequently mar our world, is how to illuminate these horrific events in paint,” Honigman adds. “I hope to not only shed light on a particular time and place, but show that the paintings also stand on their own as part of the continuum that is the history of human experience.”
 
If you have questions about this exhibit, please call Sandra Emmerson at (718) 862-7329 or e-mail sandra.emmerson@manhattan.edu