Lasallian Leader Joins Manhattan Community from San Francisco

Also a recipient of The Quadrangle scholarship, Maya Astabie ’16 aspires to write.

When Maya Astabie ’16 first heard about Manhattan College during her junior year of high school from a friend, she was instantly attracted to the school’s Lasallian heritage and close proximity to New York City.

Maya AstabieAstabie spent the majority of her four years at Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory in San Francisco discovering the true mission of Saint John Baptist de La Salle, founder of the Christian Brothers.

As an active volunteer, she has spent time working with kids at Silver Tree Day Camp and teaching disadvantaged students at De Marillac Academy, a Lasallian school in the impoverished Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco.

 “I was teaching students in fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grade, and I learned so much,” Astabie says. “Teaching them how to write and seeing them be proud of themselves really made my summer.”

“The work that she did greatly enhanced the quality of education and allowed many students to reach their potential this summer,” adds Paul Avvento ’07, a history teacher and director of Student Activities at De Marillac Academy. “Maya embodies the true Lasallian spirit reaching out to those in need as a partner, not as a superior.”

In fact, she will join the Lasallian Leaders at Manhattan, a scholarship program founded as a way to acknowledge new students who attended a Lasallian Catholic high school and are committed to community service and expanding service to the College community.

Much of Astabie’s passion for serving others was also displayed in her student leadership roles. She was committed to raising money and awareness at her high school in the wake of the earthquake in Japan, and also highly involved with student council all four years.

“When I was a sophomore I joined a spirit committee at my school called Big Green, and I was really into it because it was more than just planning events and letting them happen,” Astabie adds. “It was more getting involved in the crowd and helping people have fun and getting to know people.”

She will join the Lasallian Leaders at Manhattan, a scholarship program founded as a way to acknowledge new students who attended a Lasallian Catholic high school and are committed to community service and expanding service to the College community

If she wasn’t busy enough in high school, Astabie also managed to find time to run track, mentor freshmen on the cross country team, and be a member of the campus ministry.

In the classroom, she has maintained a 3.6 GPA, and after taking English honors during her sophomore year and Advanced Placement language this past year, Astabie says she is ready to embark on a communication major at Manhattan College.

“I loved both classes because they pushed me to further my writing skills and find my voice,” Astabie says. “And it was through that that I learned to combine my outgoing talking abilities with my writing.”

A recipient of The Quadrangle scholarship, Astabie will spend the next four years further developing and honing her writing skills at the College’s newspaper.

“Manhattan is fortunate to have someone as dedicated as she is for the next four years and I look forward to hearing wonderful stories in the near future,” Avvento says. “She has an ability to bring others in and make everyone feel welcomed and appreciated and that spirit is contagious.”

When asking where she sees herself in four years, Astabie says, “My dream is to end up working at Lucky magazine and settling in New York City.”