Business Students Visit India as Part of College’s New M.B.A. Program

As an academic component to Manhattan College’s new graduate M.B.A. program launching this fall, 10 graduate business students from the Class of 2012 embarked on a two week trip to India earlier this summer to gain a first-hand look at the rising Indian market.

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As an academic component to Manhattan College’s new graduate M.B.A. program launching this fall, 10 graduate business students from the Class of 2012 embarked on a two week trip to India earlier this summer to gain a first-hand look at the rising Indian market.

Prior to departing for India, the students had two classroom meetings to discuss and analyze India’s unique place in the global economy and how businesses operate. Students submitted a final paper at the end of summer as part of the completion to this academic component. The trip was designed to offer students the opportunity to visit a variety of local companies and factories, and learn more extensively about day-to-day business operations in India. In addition, students attend onsite seminars with Indian businessmen, politicians, intellectuals

The trip began in Delhi, India with a visit to the U.S. Embassy, and students heard about careers in the State Department and the current economic and political situation within India. On the second day, the students listened to presentations on Model Rural Youth Development Organization (MRYDO), a non-profit organization that provides services to underdeveloped communities (such as Najafgarh, Delhi and Haryana) at the company’s main office in Prem Nagar. In particular, MRYDO explained how the company is helping to empower the women of these communities through self-help groups.

“This was one of the more rewarding stops on the trip and prior to visiting MRYDO, all I knew about micro-finance groups was what I read about in class or in the newspaper in relation to Haiti and other third world countries,” said Eduardo Baez ’11. “Getting the opportunity to see the inner workings of these groups provided me with insight as to how people from rural communities and villages are able to empower themselves and start their own business, and the concept of inter-person lending is powerful and its potential had far reaching effects. One of the women in the village was able to send her daughter off to college and others were able to start their own businesses.”

“We were told that the women and children within these groups are taught several skills in order to better their lives and their financial situations,” added Baez. “We got to see the classrooms where they were taught cosmetology and sewing.”

The remainder of the trip was spent touring and seeing other companies including: Brenntag Ingredients, a distributor of industrial and specialty chemical ingredients; Quatrro BPO Solutions, a global business process outsourcing market share company; and Tata Consulting Services (TCS), a subsidiary of the Tata Group. The students also saw the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore (IIM), a prestigious institution, which offers post-graduate programs.

In addition to the academic portion of the trip, students were able to explore and experience the city of Bangalore’s Bull Temple, botanical garden and the palace, the Taj Mahal, Agra Fort, go to an elephant camp and much more.

“I feel there is no better way to learn about doing business in India than to actually be there on the ground,” said Grishma Shah, Ph.D., assistant professor of management and marketing in the school of business. “This not only engages the students with professionals on the field, but more importantly, it enables them to observe, experience and absorb the thousands of things going on around them. All of this culminates in a holistic experience, which allows for a much greater understanding of the larger paradigm in which business operates in India.”

Learn more about Manhattan College’s new M.B.A. program, and check out the group's blog.

Pictured above: Manhattan College M.B.A. students gathered at Brenntag Ingredients (photo taken by Joseph Fernandes).