Water & Air Quality/Environmental

Environmental Quality

Water Use & Management

Involved Faculty

  • Kevin Farley: PhD, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering-Expertise in water quality modeling, sediment contamination, bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals, and metals
  • James Abulencia: PhD, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering-Expertise in chemical engineering and thermodynamics
  • Richard Carbanaro: PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering-Specialized in the field of environmental chemistry and contaminant fate and transport in natural waters, soils and sediments
  • Scott Lowe: PhD, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering-Expertise in fluid mechanics, hydraulic design and air quality models
  • Kirk Barrett: PhD, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering-Expertise in water quality and urban stormwater and nonpoint source pollution control

Books/Book Chapters

  • Farley, K.J.  “Water Quality and Sustainability of the Hudson River Estuary,” in Water Quality and Sustainability, J.L. Schnoor (ed), Elsevier, Burlington, MA, 2012, (submitted).  (FARLEY, KEVIN)
  • Barrett, K. R. 2000. Urban stormwater management and nonpoint source pollution control. Standard Handbook of Environmental Science, Health and Technology (J. Lehr, ed.) McGraw-Hill. pp 9.42-76. (BARRETT, KIRK)

Articles

  • Abulencia, J.P., Abraham, N., Caraccio, A., Gallardo, S., McDonnell, K., Ruffini, N., Tanala, F. “Sustainability of Water Resources for the Poor.”  Consilience: The Journal of Sustainable Development 2010, 155-166.  (ABULENCIA, JAMES)
  • Barrett, K. R. 1999. Ecological engineering in water resources: The benefits of collaborating with nature. Water International, Journal of the International Water Resources Association. v 24, p182-188. (BARRETT, KIRK)
  • Hey, D. L., A. Kenimer and K. R. Barrett. 1994. Water quality improvement by four experimental wetlands. Ecological Engineering. v 3, pp 381-397. (BARRETT, KIRK)
  • Barrett, K. R. and W. Goldsmith. 1998. Bioengineered wetlands and ponds in an existing stream channel for stormwater management and ecological enhancement. Engineering Approaches To Ecosystem Restoration: Proceedings of the 1998 Wetlands Engineering & River Restoration Conference (Donald F. Hayes, ed). ASCE. CD-ROM publication. (BARRETT, KIRK)
  • Goldsmith, W., K. R. Barrett, M. Larson and W. Lattrell. 1998. Stabilization and restoration of an urban incised channel: Design, construction and monitoring. Engineering Approaches To Ecosystem Restoration: Proceedings of the 1998 Wetlands Engineering & River Restoration Conference (Donald F. Hayes, ed). ASCE. CD-ROM publication. (BARRETT, KIRK)

Projects

  • Creating a sustainable water purification solution for poor communities in the Philippines: Poor rural communities face the challenge of obtaining clean, drinkable water.  One such community is Nagcarlan, Philippines, which is an agricultural town south of Manila that is dense with coconut trees.  Our project, which is done with Dr. Susan Gallardo in the Chemical Engineering Department at De La Salle University in Manila, leveraged this abundant material by converting coconut shells to activated carbon, which can be used to remove harmful waterborne pollutants.  By housing the materials inside bamboo, which is also abundant in this community, the outcome was an effective, sustainable, and biodegradable water filter that the local citizens can construct independently.  Three other communities are currently interested in this technology, prompting us to begin working with their local governments for potential implementation.  This work has been funded by the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance (NCIIA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Department of Science and Technology (DOST) of the Philippines. (ABULENCIA, JAMES)
  • Water Desalination using Concrete: Communities adjacent to the ocean have an advantage of being close to an abundant water source if they have the means to desalinate.  Methods such as reverse osmosis (RO) are costly, while simple technologies such as boiling is energy and resource intensive.  This project, which is done with Dr. Goli Nossoni in the Civil Engineering Department at Manhattan College and Dr. Susan Gallardo in the Chemical Engineering Department at De La Salle University in Manila, aims to use concrete "membranes" coupled with an electric field as a low-cost, energy lean method to desalinate water.  The group recently received funding from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop this technology, and is currently in the experimental phase. (ABULENCIA, JAMES)
  • Development of a Screening-Level Model for Metal Contamination in Lakes: Metal contamination from mining operations and other industrial activities is receiving increased attention in regulatory programs both in the United States and Europe.  In support of these programs, we have developed a screening-level model (TICKET-UWM) for assessing the combined effects of metal transport, chemical speciation and kinetics on metal toxicity to fish and other aquatic species in lakes.  Continuing work on TICKET-UWM is currently being performed to include new descriptions for metal binding to natural organic matter (based on WHAM VI and WHAM VII formulations) and test the applicability of TICKET-UWM at several field sites.  (Continued funding is provided though the Robert V. Thomann Fellowship.) (FARLEY, KEVIN)
  • Predicting the Fate and Effects of Resuspended Metal Contaminated Sediments: Metal release from contaminated sediments during propeller wash and other strong resuspension events is a particular concern at U.S. Navy facilities and in commercial ports throughout the United States.  To help assess potential environmental impacts, we are working with investigators from the University of Michigan and from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in developing modeling tools to predict the release and subsequent exposure and effects of metals on fish and other aquatic organisms during resuspension events.  Our work is specially focusing on the effects of sediment and water chemistry on the bioavailability of metals before, during and after sediment resuspension events.  (Funding is provided through the Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP).) (FARLEY, KEVIN)

Courses Offered

  • LEEN 401 – Sustainable Water Resource Engineering
  • CIVL 407 – Groundwater Resources
  • ENVL 406 – Water and Wastewater Treatment
  • ENVL 505 – Surface Water Quality Monitoring
  • ENVL 507 – Groundwater

Lower Hudson Watershed

Involved Faculty

  • Kevin Farley: PhD, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering-Expertise in
    water quality modeling, sediment contamination, bioaccumulation of toxic
    chemicals, and metals

Books/Book Chapters

  • Farley, K.J.  “Water Quality and Sustainability of the Hudson River Estuary,” in Water Quality and Sustainability, J.L. Schnoor (ed), Elsevier, Burlington, MA, 2012, (submitted).  (FARLEY, KEVIN)
  • Farley, K.J., Wands, J.R., Damiani, D.R., Cooney, T.F.  “Transport, Fate and Bioaccumulation of PCBs in the Lower Hudson River,” in The Hudson River Estuary, J.S. Levington and J.R. Waldman (eds), Cambridge University Press, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 368-382.  (FARLEY, KEVIN)
  • Baker, J.E., Bohlen, W.F., Bopp, R.F., Brownawell, B., Collier, T.K., Farley, K.J., Geyer, W.R., Nairn, R., Rosman, L.  “PCBs in the Upper and Tidal Freshwater Hudson River Estuary: The Science behind the Dredging Controversy,” in The Hudson River Estuary, J.S. Levington and J.R. Waldman (eds), Cambridge University Press, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 349-367. (FARLEY, KEVIN)

Articles

  • Diamond, M.L., Gandhi, N., Adams, W.J., Atherton, J., Bhavsar, S.P., Bulle, C.,  Campbell, P.G.C., Dubreuil, A., Fairbrother, A., Farley, K., Green, A., Guinee, J., Hauschild, M.Z., Huijbregts, M.A.J., Humbert, S., Jensen, K.S., Jolliet, O., Margni, M., McGeer, J.C.,  Peijnenburg, W.J.G.M.,  Rosenbaum, R., van de Meent, D., Vijver, M.G. “The Clearwater Consensus: The Estimation of Metal Hazard in Fresh Water.” Int J Life Cycle Assess 2010, 15:143–147.  (FARLEY, KEVIN)

Projects

  • Evaluation of PCB Transport and Fate in the Lower Hudson River: As dredging of PCB-contaminated sediments in the Upper Hudson progresses, there is continued concern of PCB transport and contamination into the Lower Hudson River.  Computer models have therefore been developed to evaluate the long-term transport and fate of PCBs in the Lower Hudson River and New York-New Jersey Harbor.  Our current work is specially focusing on refinements in model descriptions for hydrodynamic model grid resolution, sediment transport and organic carbon in the mainstem Hudson.  Results from the revised model are being used as part of an overall re-assessment for PCB transport and fate in the Lower Hudson River.  (Funding is provided through the Hudson River Foundation). (FARLEY, KEVIN)

Environment Restoration & Protection

Courses Offered

  • ENGG 670 – Pollution Prevention
  • CHML 538 – Air Pollution Control
  • CHML 574 – Green Engineering Design
  • ENVL 315 – Engineering Ecology
  • ENVL 410 – Hazardous Waste Design